Preventing Permit Abuse

PREVENTING PERMIT ABUSE
One of the issues that Operation No Permit No Park has highlighted aside from disability parking offences, is the variance of permit abuse or fraud.

 

It seems innocent now but this permit was discovered over a year ago. Permits are only issued for 5 years so prior to August 2015 this permit could not have been issued with that date.

It seems innocent now but this permit was discovered over a year ago. Permits are only issued for 5 years so prior to August 2015 this permit could not have been issued with that date.

People have tried everything from deliberate placement of the permit so the expiry can’t be seen, to removing the expiry and permit number, to manipulation of the expiry date, to continue using permits that are no longer valid. This is rarely done by the original permit holder. For whatever reason, people seem to pass them on to others when they have their replacement. I should note that so far my research has revealed that the most common situation for an expired permit being fraudulently used is once the permit holder is deceased. 
 
I have been working with the Queensland Department of Transport on ways to reduce permit fraud. Despite the conditions of the permit stating that they must be returned when no longer required, permits are rarely returned and it is not enforced.
 
The new ADPP style IS much more difficult to manipulate so we do see less abuse of those types but it does still occur by concealment. Queensland is not alone, with similar issues in other states with different types of permits. My goal is to share successful fraud prevention methods nationally.
 

The best solution found so far has been to include the holographic printing on the date like we do on the new style ADPP. It makes it very difficult to alter the date.

Permit misuse can be reported through the issuing authority. You will need the permit number, car registration and any additional information you can provide.

Qld: http://www.qld.gov.au/disability/out-and-about/parking-permits/#report 

NSW: http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/using-roads/mobility-parking/

SA: https://www.sa.gov.au/directories/customer-service-centres/enquiries-and-complaints

WA: http://www.app.org.au/

VIC: Contact the issuing council

TAS: Contact the department of State Growth Transport Scheme – Phone: 1300 135 513 Email: passenger.transport@stategrowth.tas.gov.au

ACT: Contact the Transport Authority – http://www.rego.act.gov.au/parking/special-parking-permits/australian-disability-parking-permits

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Comments (2)

  1. Heather Hadley-Powell

    Reply

    Also, being on a central wide Australia wide database, would enable data matching, so when a permit holder dies, their details of name, date of birth, address would be checked with any existing permit, and the microchip would then be remotely zapped to kill that permit and the original expiry date would no longer apply.

  2. John Counsel

    Reply

    Microchipping can be problematic due to physical limitations.

    QR codes would be quick and easy and can be in the form of a permanent label affixed to the permit, generated and printed in-house by the issuing Council. Anyone can the scan them with their smartphone to check whether they’re valid or not.

    Like Heather’s suggestion, a central database — preferably national — would be required, but the technology already exists to do this (it’s called the Internet).

    Privacy would be simple to protect with access codes for those authorised (Council staff, police). Anyone else scanning the QR code would be told only if the permit is valid or not.

    Anyone whose permit isn’t renewed is automatically suspended.

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