Selling the Back of My Wheelchair as Advertising Space

I’ve just discovered a new practice in advertising that needs to stop. NOW.

It seems innocent enough and someone probably thought they were really clever, low cost, relocatable, easy. What they haven’t realised is they are setting themselves up for the chain of causation should there be an accident. Here’s why….

There’s a standard in the building code in designing car parks. There are rules and legislation that must be followed and councils are responsible for checking everything has been adhered to and the building and surrounds are compliant before signing off on the Development Application Approval. If anything changes after that Development Application has been approved, council should be notified or else it deems the decision invalid. This is why even certain building and land renovations require a development application.

If the building is non compliant to building standards, access standards, safety standards or any other relevant standard, and council approve it, they could be liable for any future damage or injury caused. If this changes after the case of approval, the building/land owner could be liable, or the person who caused the change without permission of the previous mentioned.

It might seem so insignificant and trivial but there’s something that businesses have started doing that is not only an inconvenience, but also a risk to the public.

Covering of the bollards in the Disability Parking Zone (DPZ) with advertising material.

A Disability Parking Zone with 2 parking bays and a shared space between them. The bollard at the end of the shared space has been covered with a corflute triangular stand making the bollard less visible. There is also an advertising A Frame placed next to it making the shared space less accessible.

A Disability Parking Zone with 2 parking bays and a shared space between them. The bollard at the end of the shared space has been covered with a corflute triangular stand making the bollard less visible. There is also an advertising A Frame placed next to it making the shared space less accessible.

Bollards are placed in the middle space for a reason. To prevent vehicles from parking there. This space in the middle allows occupants of the vehicles parked in the DPZ to access the vehicle easily and safely and if desired, independently. Particularly for users of mobility devices such as wheelchairs or walkers.

The bollards are in a recommended position, recommended height and recommended colour. There’s also logic in that too. So that they are easily visible to drivers and they do hit them.

So hypothetically speaking, should a driver in a car park reverse into one of these covered bollards they have a case to claim against the chain of causation for damages if they can show that they were unable to see the bollard due to it blending into the surroundings or just not being clearly visible.

What gets me most is why, why on earth do people think using the accessible area is appropriate for their advertising? Is it because it’s cheap and convenient to them and they really don’t see us as customers so it doesn’t matter if they inconvenience us?

Seriously if you want some real mileage for your money on advertising, why not rent the space on the back of my wheelchair or mobility scooter? I got everywhere on my scooter, and being a young and sometimes trendy 40 year old I get some attention on that thing when I’m out. No, you wouldn’t would you? If you won’t rent the space on the back of my wheelchair, why use the accessible areas intended for me to be included in my community? As your customer? Stop being lazy. And inconsiderate. Your methods reek of ableism.

Image of the back of a wheelchair with a man sitting in it. There is a sign on the back saying "Advertise Here Call 1800 Stop Ableism"

Image of the back of a wheelchair with a man sitting in it. There is a sign on the back saying “Advertise Here Call 1800 Stop Ableism”

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Comments (7)

  1. Roger

    Reply

    Yes so many buisnesses dont get it need more parking inspectors to start booking the owners of these signs hopefully then it might start to stop. As for the advertising on the back of a wheelchair brilliant idea.

    • nopermitnopark

      Reply

      Difficulty is that it doesn’t fall under a parking offence. Not all council parking inspectors are approved compliance officers. Police certainly aren’t either. I might just start running (wheeling) off with signs as I find them and hold them to ransom. All paid ransoms will be donated to disability services 😉

      • Jenny Williams

        Reply

        Definitely loving the idea of a ransom on illegally placed advertising signs! I reckon you’d be good at that!

  2. John Counsel

    Reply

    How about a large sticker in the centre of the ads saying something like “THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS IN BREACH OF THE DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT 1992 AND THIS BUILDING’S PLANNING PERMIT. IF IT’S STILL HERE IN 24 HOURS FORMAL COMPLAINTS WILL BE LODGED WITH THE RELEVANT AUTHORITIES.”

    • nopermitnopark

      Reply

      Stealing them and holding them to ransom would be way more fun

      • Belinda

        Reply

        I’m up for that. I think it would get through there thick heads that they can’t have there signs there.

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